Cream of Chicken and Wild Rice Soup

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Sorry for the lack of posts of late. To make up for the absence, here is a hearty, flavorful Cream of Chicken & Wild Rice Soup for your enjoyment. 🙂 Given it’s Fall, it’s the perfect Fall lunch, appetizer or main course. Of course, inasmuch as Thanksgiving is almost upon us, this is something you could make with leftover turkey, too. Give it a try. 🙂

Wild rice is one of my favorite things in the world. I love the chewy, dense texture with the nutty, vegetal taste. It’s really remarkable stuff and has been considered a delicacy in the US for years. There’s even a species of wild rice grown in Texas along the banks of San Marcus River. This species ,however, (somewhat like Texas liberals) is becoming extinct due to loss of habitat and pollution. Not surprisingly, you don’t find Texas wild rice at your local market. Instead, the wild rice that is commonly found at your grocer is a species native to the Great Lakes region of North America. Further, despite its name, wild rice isn’t a rice at all. It’s the seed of an aquatic grass and has been eaten by people since prehistoric times. Early North American inhabitants, especially the Ojibway, Menomini, and Cree tribes in the North Central region, used the grain as a staple food and called it Manomio – “good berry.” These natives introduced European fur traders to the good berry who took it back to Europe where it became a very popular dish. Early English explorers called this aquatic plant wild rice or Indian rice. The French, on the other hand, saw a resemblance to oats and called it folle avoine. Other names include Canadian rice, squaw rice, water oats, blackbird oats, and marsh oats. Given our English heritage, the name “wild rice” persisted and it is now the common international name for this aquatic grass seed.

While not a “superfood” wild rice has great nutritional benefits. Indeed, wild rice is high in protein, lysine and dietary fiber It’s also low in fat and, like true rice, it’s gluten free. It is also a good source of certain minerals and B vitamins. One cup of cooked wild rice provides 5% or more of the daily value of thiamin, riboflavin, iron, and potassium; 10% or more of the daily value of niacin, B6, folate, magnesium, and phosphorus; 15% of zinc; and over 20% of manganese.

Of course, the real reason I eat wild rice is because it tastes so darn good. 🙂 It is wonderful when combined with fowl of all kinds and is a common accompaniment during the holidays for duck, turkey, chicken, game hens, pheasant, quail, etc. It also works well as an accompaniment for pork tenderloin, pork loin and makes a beautiful dressing for a pork crown roast. You can add mushrooms, scallions, nuts, and cranberries to it to change the character of the dish or you can steam it with various stocks or just water. It’s also wonderful in this soup. Give it a try. You will like it. This is what we did.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup wild rice
  • 1-1/2 cup water
  • 5 chicken thighs (skinless but bone-in)
  • 10 cups chicken stock (preferably homemade)
  • 2 large shallots, minced (roughly 1/2 cup)
  • 1/3 cup celery, small dice
  • 1/2 cup parsnips, small dice
  • 2 large jalapeños, seeded and small dice (roughly 1/3 cup)
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced (roughly 2 Tbsp)
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • sea salt & pepper, to taste
  • chopped chives for garnish
© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Instruction

First thing first, steam the rice. Add 1-1/2 cups water, a pitch of salt and 1/2 cup wild rice to a small pot. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer, cover and cook for 30 minutes or until tender and the water is absorbed.

While the rice is cooking, add oil to a large pot over medium-high heat.

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Add shallots

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

celery

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

parsnips

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

garlic,

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

and jalapeños

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Sweat the veggies for 5 minutes or until the garlic becomes aromatic. Now add the chicken stock.

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Bring to a boil and add the chicken thighs.

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Return to a boil, reduce heat medium and allow chicken thighs to poach. Poaching the chicken thighs in the broth allows the chicken meat to retain much of its flavor. Also, poaching allows the meat to maintain it’s moisture. After 20 – 30 minutes, remove the chicken thighs from the pot, remove the bone, dice the chicken and set aside.

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Put the thigh bones back in the pot, increase the heat to medium high and allow to cook another 30 – 45 minutes to extract all of the goodness from the bones.

Next, remove the bones and, using an immersion blender, puree the veggies in the pot.

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Add Salt, to taste

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Add wild rice

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

the chicken meat

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

and heavy cream

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Now, heat everything thoroughly and thicken by any means you wish, i.e. arrowroot, tapioca, non-GMO corn starch, etc. – your choice based upon your dietary needs and habits. Adjust seasonings to taste.

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Sprinkle with chopped fresh chives, serve & enjoy. 🙂

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com
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20 thoughts on “Cream of Chicken and Wild Rice Soup”

  1. We’ve missed you ! What an interesting recipe – I very much like parsnips and I hardly ever see them included in a recipe – especially a recipe for soup. Pinning it ; o )

    1. I’m somewhat confused, too. 3 others have pinned the recipe (including me) and it doesn’t reflect rufusguide. Somehow, yours does in the comment section. You may want to see if you can edit it out. The link, however, does go back to the soup recipe. Go figure. 😮

  2. I missed you too! But I’m never a really reliable poster either, although I do try to do it twice a week but that doesn’t always work out. No worries, Richard. This is another wonderful soup recipe I would certainly try, thanks!

    1. Thanks, Kathryn. I hadn’t realized it was over 2 weeks between posts. Life has been busy with several projects and work that has thrown our schedules off a bit. I have been trying to do about 15 posts per month but that can be a little overwhelming for us and the readers. We still cook most nights so there is now a sizable backlog of posts to do. 😮 Glad you like the soup. It’s very tasty and, while elaborate, there are several shortcuts you can take to feed a family (use pre-cooked/leftover chicken, don’t worry about the bones, etc.). I just like to extract all the flavor out of the foods I prepare.

      1. This soup does not look any more labor-intensive then most other soups I prepare. I almost always make the broth from raw chicken, too, even when I have a freezer-full of it.

        By the way, I went tubing on the San Marcos river this past June during my family reunion, and they had some very friendly kayakers reminding us not to pull the “rare San Marcos wild rice” and throw it at each other. Not that we were doing that, but apparently some tubers find it fun…

  3. What a fantastic soup for a wild rice lover like me! We are talking about a ‘luxury good’ in Australia, but this is one for which I am willing to tighten my belt in other matters. Love the story behind it also ~ only knew of the grasses growing in the Lakes region and have learned so much else from this post also! Oh, and I would certainly make this a main meal 🙂 !

  4. That sounds and looks like a very nice soup, Richard. I like how you poach the chicken in the stock, and return the bones to the soup to extract all their flavor. I’ve also learned about wild rice, which I’ve never cooked with and always thought was just a wild variety of rice.

Food for thoughts

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