© 2013 REMCooks.com

Pan Fried Eggplant with Pork

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

What a delightful dinner. Doesn’t this look tasty? It was. But what is that green stuff?

Everybody is familiar with the Aubergine eggplant that some consider American eggplant. Aubergines are bulbous, dark purple, dryer, spongy and more meaty eggplant. I use aubergines for timballo, for baba ghannouj, eggplant parmesan, among other tasty dishes. Then you have the lesser known Oriental eggplants. Oriental eggplants are long and narrow. They range in color from dark purple to lighter purple (leaning toward pink) and one variety with green hues. There are several varieties of Oriental eggplant, i.e. Chinese eggplant, Japanese eggplant, and Filipino eggplant. The Chinese eggplant is longer, more pink than purple, and is lighter in taste and texture with a mild bitter flavor. Japanese eggplant is very similar to Chinese eggplant and many confuse it for the latter. It is a dark purple color without the mild bitter flavor of the Chinese eggplant. It is sweeter and has more moisture than the Aubergine. Last, but not least, is the eggplant we used in this dish, Filipino eggplant. Filipino eggplants have a green hue that mutes the universal purple color associated with eggplant. It has very mild flavor that is sweet yet mildly bitter, and the softest of the eggplants. It is perfect for stir fries like this dish.

This dish came from Criss-cross Pan Fried Eggplant with some minor modifications because it sounded so darn good. We love eggplant and are always looking for new ways to fix it. This also is the second time we made it. We made it per the recipe the first time and, while very tasty, decided it needed a little modification. After making it twice, we have also reached the conclusion that scoring the eggplant is an utter waste of time. Regardless, this is one tasty meal that you definitely need to try. In fact, Baby Lady says to let you know this is one incredibly flavorful meal that would be her “go to eggplant dish,” especially if she wanted Asian food. It’s quick, simple and perfect for weeknight meals. Here’s what we did.

Ingredients

  • 1-1/2 lb Filipino eggplant
  • 8 oz. ground pork
  • 1/2 large white onion, thinly sliced
  • 3 Tbsp garlic chives, sliced
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 4 Tbsp soy sauce, split
  • 2 tsp sesame oil
  • 1/4 tsp white pepper
  • 2 tsp cornstarch
  • 1 tsp brown sugar
  • 1/2 cups oil
  • 2 green Thai chiles, thinly sliced
© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Instruction

Slice the eggplant in half lengthwise,

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

then score the eggplant 1/4 inch deep in a criss-cross pattern and cut into 2 inch long segments.

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Scoring the eggplant takes a little time and adds nothing to the dish flavor-wise, cooking-wise, or aesthetic-wise that we could see. As such, we will omit it when we make it again and we will make this dish again. It’s a real keeper.

Put the ground pork into a mixing bowl and add  2 Tbsp soy sauce.

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Add the white pepper

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

the cornstarch

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

sesame oil

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

mix to incorporate

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Add oil to heavy bottom skillet over medium-high heat and, when hot, place eggplant flat side down.

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Add sea salt

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

When browned, roughly 3 minutes, turn and cook on the other side.

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Remove from the pan and set aside.

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Add Thai chiles to remaining oil in skillet and fry to flavor the oil.

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Remove chiles from oil and discard.

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Add onions to the skillet and sauté until softened, roughly 2 minutes

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Now, add the garlic

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Add pork mixture and cook until done

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Return eggplant to skillet

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Add remaining 2 Tbsp soy sauce.

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

and brown sugar

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

When the eggplants have reheated through, add the garlic chives

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Serve & enjoy.

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com
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15 thoughts on “Pan Fried Eggplant with Pork”

    1. Thanks, Cristina. 🙂 It is delicious and definitely hit the spot!! We finished the meal with the chocolate chip mint custard ice cream. Very satisfying indeed. 😀

  1. Having eggplant like this has been one of the amazing revelations we’ve been privy to Asia – we eat it like this (and variations of) a lot and its freakn’ delish!!! Its cool to learn a bit more about the particular eggplants here 🙂 Love the post!

  2. Like you both, I’m an eggplant lover and this dish looks fantastic, Richard. I thought I’d seen every type, shape, and color of eggplant — until just now. That green is a new one on me. I may have passed it by at an Asian market, not realizing what it was. Well, not any more! Thanks for a great recipe and heads-up for another type of eggplant. 🙂

    1. Hi, John. Thanks for the nice compliment. 🙂 Although I had seen them I actually had never tried these Filipino eggplant before. I bought them because the Japanese eggplant at the Asian market were old, wrinkled and not very firm. I was very pleasantly surprised with the result even if I did have to re-photograph everything for this post because of the color. 😮

    1. Thanks, Stefan. I’m not so sure about the aubergine in place of the Oriental eggplant. The aubergine has a tougher skin and is more spongy than the Oriental eggplants. It also has more seeds. I think you would get a similar flavor but the texture would be off as would its plated appearance. Nevertheless, you never know if you don’t try. 😉

  3. Definitely the perfect balance of comfort food and delicious Asian flavours! I’ve often eaten something similar (at yum cha) they pack the pork inside the scooped out vessel of eggplant. Very tasty, very simple and as you said, a definite keeper!

      1. My mum just uses the regular variety. Once the inside is scooped out, they fill it, cut into smaller pieces. Place into a steamer, then ladle the sauce over it. It can be pan fried too. It’s definitely a yum cha thing, they fill okra and green capsicums too…

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