Sorbete de Tuna Roja (Red Prickly Pear Sorbet)

Sorbete de Tuna Roja

Look at this beautiful fuchsia colored sorbet. Doesn’t this look lovely? It’s Sorbete de Tuna Roja and absolutely delightful. You NEED to try this!!

OK, I’m on a dessert roll although when you finish reading this post you might think I’m on a desert roll. 😉 It’s summertime and dessert is such a nice way to showcase fruit. This time, however, there is no baking. Now, I know some of you, when you read the title, stopped at Sorbete de Tuna Roja. Tuna Sorbet you pondered. Blech!!! How can you do a sorbet with tuna???? Bear with me now and don’t go away just yet. You liked the photo didn’t you? This tastes just as good as it looks. Although I have seen a few recipes for a savory Ahi Tuna Sorbet, the tuna I’m talking about isn’t the fish type tuna of the sea. Instead, “tuna” is Spanish for the cactus pear fruit more commonly called “Prickly Pear.” Some of you are, even now, wondering if you can really eat those things. Yes, you can. Growing up in the rural Southwestern US, I’ve even seen bovine eat prickly pear where it ferments in their stomachs making them somewhat drunk. But people eat prickly pear, too. Hmmm…maybe they saw the cows eat it???? Who knows… but I digress.

In Mexico and the Suthwest US, it’s very common to see prickly pear eaten. In Mexico, street vendors, markets, cafes and high end restaurants sell prickly pear in a variety of ways. Chilled, it is a delightfully refreshing snack eaten just the way it is. Simply peel it and eat it. Very tasty, indeed.  It’s also a popular ingredient in candies, drinks, jams, sorbets and so much more. I’ve seen it served with the rice milk concoction horchata, as well as served in salads or an ingredient in sauces and salsas. It really is tasty. Again, look at the introductory photo. The same cactus that gives you nopales (cactus paddles sliced and cooked) gives you tuna or prickly pears. The difference is nopales can be had year round because it is simply the paddles of the cactus – one of those hard to kill, invasive plants. Tuna/prickly pear is the fruit and is only available in the summer. So right now is the time to enjoy it.

Now, most people view prickly pear cactus as an intruder. It’s everywhere. Anyone who lives in the Southwestern or Western US have frequently seen prickly pear cactus growing wild. Most probably passed it by without thinking twice, many never knowing it’s an edible delicacy. You see, prickly pear cactus grow wild and represent about a dozen different species of the Opuntia genus (Family Cactaceae) in the North American deserts. In fact, it grows in the boulevards in El Paso as year round foliage and I cannot tell you how any farms and ranches I have visited where it is growing wild like a weed. Because of their hardiness and low maintenance, it’s not uncommon to see them in landscaping. In fact, we have a few of them in our yard. Sadly, they are the non-fruiting kind. Drat! 😦 They are, however, spineless with pretty flowers.

Most prickly pear cactus are full of sharp spines that can get into your skin and make you just downright uncomfortable. You definitely don’t want to fall into one of these or blindly walk into one. So why would you ever want to eat one??? It’s simple, they taste good, are easy to grow (you can’t kill them) and come in a variety of species. Indeed, in Mexico there are over 100 species of prickly pear cactus with edible fruits. Only a few, however, are palatable and even fewer taste really sweet. Also, fruit size, shape, and color vary from small and round like a walnut to three inches long and two inches wide like a rounded cylinder. Skin and flesh are also varied coming in a rainbow of colors i.e. white, green, yellow, orange, red, purple, and brown. According to a friend of mine, white-skinned varieties are the most popular in Mexico. The sweetest varieties generally available in the US and the most common are the dark reddish-orange or purplish skinned prickly pears with the deep fuchsia flesh.* It was these beautiful dark reddish-purple skinned beauties we saw at the market the other day.

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Baby Lady saw them and there was simply no stopping her. She was a woman on a mission. When I realized where she had gone, it reminded me I had been wanting to make a prickly pear sorbet. So, we bought 6.5 lbs. Of course, Baby Lady had to eat hers just the way they were leaving me 5 lbs. for the sorbet. When I told her how I intended to prepare them, it was like I stabbed her in the heart with a stake. 😮 I assured her she would love what I made. I’m sure glad she trusts me. 🙂 The net out is one of the best summer sorbets you will ever eat. Fresh, colorfully vibrant, sweet, tangy and it tastes like prickly pear fruit. Whether you have ever tasted prickly pear fruit or not, you really need to try this sorbet. It’s absolutely KILLER!!!!!! This is what we did.

Ingredients

  • 5 lbs of red cactus fruits, roughly 18 fruits
  • 1 cup sugar
  • juice of 4 limes
  • 1 cup water
  • 2 Tbsp Tequila
© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Instruction

First things first, as always, make a simple syrup by adding 1 cup of sugar to a sauce pot.

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Now add the water.

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Place over medium high heat and stir until the sugar is dissolved.

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com – Not much of a photo but you get my point 😉

Set aside to cool.

Next, prepare the prickly pears. Baby Lady doesn’t believe in gloves. 😮 As a result, she is constantly putting tape or glue on her fingers to pull out the little spines. Even though they do not look like there are spines, there are! Wear plastic gloves. They do help.

To prepare the prickly pears, cut off the top and bottom.

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Sometimes when you cut the bottom off you can pull the little tag that will tear the skin from bottom to top. Otherwise, make an incision about a half-inch deep from top to bottom.

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Now, peel the skin off. If you bought ripe prickly pears, the thick outer skin should come off in one piece.

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

This is how the usable fruit looks when you’re done.

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Kinda pretty, eh? It’s very tasty, too, but it is not very sweet by itself. Continue until you have peeled all of the fruit. You will have a large amount of peel per fruit which is why you need so many prickly pears.

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Chop the prickly pears. Now, if you are unfamiliar with prickly pears, they have a lot of little hard seeds. My father-in-law, Eduardo, says eating prickly pear is like a machine gun going off in your head because there are so many small hard seeds. 😀 They are edible, digestible and are great roughage. I just don’t like roughage in my sorbet. 😮

To remove the seeds some people will tell you to simply place the fruit in a food processor, pulse and strain through a fine mesh sieve. I don’t want chopped up seeds in my sorbet and running the fruit through my Chinoise is more work than I care to do. I prefer chopping the prickly pears and putting them in my molina (hand food mill) with the finest mesh plate.

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

These are the thousands of seeds that are left.

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Now, what is left is a wonderful puree.

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Look at the beautiful, vibrant color. At this point, although pureed, the puree is still a little “meaty,” if you know what I mean. It has millions of tiny pulpy bits. Once frozen, it will give your sorbet a “grainy” texture. If you don’t mind the grainy texture, then skip this next step. I want a smooth, luxurious mouthfeel to this sorbet. So, I put the puree in my Vitamix and add the lime juice

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

and the simple syrup.

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Blend on the highest speed for 30 seconds. For typical household blenders double the time.

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Taste for sweetness/tanginess and adjust as necessary to your liking. Remember, sorbets are a balance of sweet and tangy. I initially started with 3 limes and upped it to 4 limes. Limes will vary according to size, ripeness, type, etc. and I didn’t measure the volume. 😮 So, taste it before you freeze it and it’s too late.

Pour directly into your ice cream maker.**

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Freeze according to the ice cream maker directions.

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

When almost done, add the tequila. As I have stated in previous posts, the alcohol in the tequila keeps the sorbet from freezing brick hard. Trust me on this. It also provides a wonderful depth of flavor.

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

When done (about 50 minutes from start to finish), put the sorbet in a container and freeze for a minimum of 4 hours for the ice cream to set up. I know, I know. It’s soooo good you want to eat it now but wait. Take a small taste and wait. After it has set up, scoop some of the sorbet into a serving dish and enjoy!!! This is a killer sorbet!!!

Sorbete de Tuna Roja

NOTES: *  I have seen and eaten a variety of prickly pears since I was a child. Most, however, have been the dark purplish red variety. I cannot recall ever eating a white skinned variety or one that tastes like a banana although I know they are available. If you are interested in a good overview of prickly pear fruit, I would recommend you read A Guide to Mexican Prickly Pear Cactus Fruit. While I haven’t tasted all of the tuna in his list, his comments are pretty spot on with those I have tasted.

** This made 5 cups of liquid. My Lello Musso Lussino ice cream machine makes roughly 6 cups but remember when frozen the liquid expands. 5 cups is a tad too much for a 6 qt machine. So, I made Baby Lady a Tunarita with 1/2 cup of the liquid. 🙂

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22 thoughts on “Sorbete de Tuna Roja (Red Prickly Pear Sorbet)”

    1. Hi, Virginia. Thanks for the nice compliment. The color on this sorbet is really something, isn’t it? It tastes even better than it looks. 🙂 Baby Lady also says the tunarita was unbelievably good. She wasn’t sure she would like it at first but loved it and wished she had some more. 🙂 I guess we need to go back to the market and buy some more while they are still available.

        1. I have never done it because we eat it pretty quick but I don’t see why not if you are simply looking to extract the juice. Given the nature of the flesh of the fruit and the amount of moisture within it, it would more than likely soften the flesh making it somewhat mushy. It may not be the best way to eat it but would seem to make extraction of the juice easier. 🙂 Give it a try.

    1. Thanks, Anitha. The sorbet really is the color of the fruit. Baby Lady was concerned the amount of lime in the base would bleach out the color. I told her she was very wrong. She was. 🙂

  1. The color of this sorbet, Richard, is unlike any I’ve seen. How beautiful and I bet it’s one tasty sorbet! I had a small prickly pear cactus in my garden for several years. And then my nemesis, the squirrel, took a liking to that section of the garden. He kept returning to that spot to dig, eventually killing the cactus and I’ve never found another to replace it.

    1. Thanks, John, for the very nice compliment. It is very tasty and actually tastes better than it looks, which is pretty awesome. Sorry about your prickly pear cactus. That would very much upset me. Have you learned how to cook squirrel stew, yet? 😉

    1. Thanks, Mimi. 🙂 I’m sure you can find these in Enid. I bet they even grow wild around where you live. If you have never tried the fruit, you should. It is delightful and this sorbet is sublime.

    1. Thanks, Karen. I doubt you will find it in New England because it is very perishable. It lasted in our market less than a week. I’m looking for some more and haven’t found any yet. 😦

  2. So vibrant, so purple and so unique. I’ve only ever tried the cactus in a salsa and I must add that a vibrant sorbet for summertime is far more ideal. Wow, that’s true bravery to tackle these without gloves, I was so painstakingly slow when I first dealt with these!

    Looks gorgeous!

    Ps, having trouble clicking the like button, keeps asking if I want to copy & paste. I do like!

    1. Thanks, Alice. We loved the color of this sorbet. 🙂 I’ve recently read that if you freeze the fruit and allow it to thaw it makes peeling a snap. Given the amount of water in the fruit and a texture similar to watermelon, it makes sense if you are just after the juice. If you want the meat of the fruit, too, buy some cactus pear that are pre cleaned but still wear gloves. 🙂 If they are ripe, they peel easily.
      Can you buy cactus fruit in Australia?

      1. Yes we do! They sell them during march at the local green grocers. A little Italian nonna talked me through the process of peeling them. My sweetheart has mixed feelings of these. Once he bundled the fruit into his jumper when he was fruit picking and then (mistakingly) forgot afterwards and put it back on… Whoops!

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