Carne Adovada

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

And the first post on REMCooks for 2014 is a chile recipe!!! Are you really surprised???? It is absolutely delicious!

Happy 2014!!!! This is how we greeted the New Year…with Carne Adovada. Now, Carne Adovada is not to be confused with carne adobada. Carne adobada is a Mexican dish, adobada meaning marinated. Adobada consists of meat marinated in a spicy chile and vinegar based sauce known as adobo. The meat typically is pork, however, other cuts of meats may be used, as well. Adobada is made by pureeing soaked chiles, along with vinegar and other preferred flavoring ingredients, to form a sauce. The meat is typically covered in the sauce and stored in the refrigerator for up to 24 hours to allow the sauce flavors to permeate the meat and add a deep flavor.

Carne Adovada, on the other hand, is a New Mexican dish consisting of pork cooked in a sauce of dried New Mexico red chiles with vinegar, garlic, onions, oregano, cilantro and sometimes cumin and other spices. Like every New Mexican dish there are loads of different variations and techniques. Some like to roast the pork; whereas, others like to braise it. Some people like big chunks of pork versus small cubes. Still, other like theirs shredded, slow cooked, meltingly tender and blazingly spicy. Then there are the differences and variations in spices used.

This is my version of Carne Adovada. It is incredibly flavorful with great depth of flavor. It has some heat but not overpowering, searing heat. Guaranteed you will want to lick the plate when you’re finished. Now, this is what I did.

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup oil or lard
  • 3-1/2 lbs. pork shoulder, cubed into 3/4-inch cubes
  • 2 cup diced onion
  • 2 Tbsp minced garlic
  • 4 cup homemade beef stock (chicken stock or water – don’t use commercial beef stock)
  • 2 tsp ground coriander seed
  • 2 tsp dried Mexican oregano
  • 2-1/2 oz dried New Mexico Chiles,* toasted and seeded
  • 1 Tbsp honey
  • 2 Tbsp red wine vinegar
  • 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp ground cumin
  • salt to taste
© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

Instruction

Preheat the oven to 350°.

Heat the oil/lard in a large skillet. I had some fat from trimming and cutting the pork shoulder so I rendered the fat until I had roughly 1/3 cup. Next, brown the pork in batches.

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

Set the pork aside.

Add the onion to skillet and sauté until golden.

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

Add the garlic and sauté for 1 minute.

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

Deglaze the skillet with 1 cup of the stock scraping up the sucs/fond from the bottom of the pan.

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

Add the cooked onions, garlic and broth from the pot into a blender.

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

Add oregano,

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

coriander

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

cumin,

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

honey,

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

red wine vinegar

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

red chiles,

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

salt

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

and the rest of the stock.

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

Process until the mixture is thoroughly combined and smooth.

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

Now, at this point I realized I had forgotten to add the cinnamon. Oh well, add it now. It really doesn’t make any difference at this point.

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

Now, return the browned pork to the pot.

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

Add the chile sauce and stir to combine well.

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

Place pot uncovered in the preheated oven and cook for 1 hour or until the pork is tender.

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

After 1 hour, remove pot from oven, serve with a nice salad, some warm tortillas & enjoy!

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

NOTES:  * I used a blend of chiles, mild New Mexico Red chiles and Hot Sandia chiles. You can use whatever chiles you desire as the flavor of the dish will change with the type of chile used. Also, the 2-1/2 oz is the weight AFTER seeding and stemming the dried chiles.

About these ads

35 thoughts on “Carne Adovada

  1. Quite obviously I have never cooked a dish with its recipe emanating from New Mexico. So this is an exciting way to begin the year up your way!! And try it I shall soonest Cinnamon and oregano and some of the curry spices: curious me really wants to know how all of this tastes!! Nearly 2 kg of meat is quite an amount for this currently single lady to cook, but if friends will not come for a taste test it seems this would both keep a few days or [shock and horrors] freeze? [Oh, that apron is quite a piece of art in itself: the only BAM I know is Bobbi Marshall of the wonderful HK blog fame!}

    • :D Thanks, Eha. It is wonderfully tasty and the cinnamon is what takes this dish over the top. The apron was a gift because i love cajun/creole food. BAM is from Emeril Lagasse, an American chef from Boston who worked at the Commander’s Palace in New Orleans with the Brennan family. He was THE chef of New Orleans and has several of his own restaurants in New Orleans, now. When he would do his TV show he would “kick it up a notch” with spices and cayenne pepper and yell “BAM.” :D

      • What fun!! And I know something new again :) ! Am probably giving my age away but have eaten at Brennan’s [methinks now closed] and Commander’s Palace quite a few times way back!! Liked the second better than the first which used to be quite well known for its Eggs Benedict and champagne brunches in the days I would still eat such :) !

        • I’ve spent many dinners and brunches at both. My preference is and always has been Commanders Palace. Brennan’s closed on June 28, 2013 due to a Brennan family dispute. The Brennan family is supposed to re-open in a new location sometime in 2014.

  2. Your chili sounds good with ingredients I will have no trouble finding. I don’t have a food scale (shame on me)… about how many dried New Mexico chilies do you think I would need to use for in this chili?

    • Hi, Karen. Hope your are doing OK with the winter blizzard bearing down on you. I think you will really like this chile recipe. The cinnamon adds a wonderful dimension to the dish and gives it somewhat of a mole flavor but without the chocolate. I believe I used 6 – 8 Red New Mexico mild chiles and 6 Sandia hot chiles. Now, remember, the age of chiles and dryness will affect their weight. The Red New Mexico mild chiles I had were roughly 5 inches long, soft & pliable. The Sandia chiles I have had for about 7 months. Even vacuum sealed they are pretty dehydrated. Taste it as you blend it. If it needs more heat, add another hot chile. Also, you can use ground chiles if you prefer. It’s just so hard to get ground New Mexico chiles and the ancho chiles (typical chile powder) will make this dish a little on the sweet side. If you choose to use a blend of chiles, i.e. ground chipotle, Ancho, New Mexico, etc. you need 3/4 cup.

  3. Thanks for the walk-through. Following your suggestion, I have this on the list to do over the next couple of weeks. It looks delicious. I do have to also complement you on your fine apron. A lot jazzier than the old rags I tend to wear. For some reason, they tend to not make it to the washing machine too often and get what I call “character”. The Wife has a different word for it.
    Happy New Year to you both,
    Conor

    • Thanks, Conor. You actually have the chiles to make this dish and with the winter upon us it is an ideal dish. As for the apron, I recently washed all of the aprons and removed as much of the character as I could. This was the first time I had worn the characterless apron so it seemed like a good time to showcase it. Of course, it does wash out some of the colors of the chile in the blender. :o Oh, the price you pay for style and fashion. ;)

  4. This sounds like something I’d like to try. I still have some chiles left to use for this ;-) Think I will use pork stock instead and perhaps cook it sous-vide or in a pressure cooker?

    • Hi, Stefan. This is a great dish. The chiles you have will be perfect for it. Given the strong flavor of the chiles, it really doesn’t make much difference as to the stock. I had beef stock but not pork stock although deboning the pork shoulder did give me some bone for a later pork stock. :)

        • We just had this for dinner. I’m a bit puzzled as there was a bitter note to the sauce that I can’t explain very well. Perhaps it was a bad idea to include chipotles in the mix of chiles? Cooking the pork sous-vide worked very well. I think it was a one off problem, so I’ll try it again.

      • Hmmm…We are both puzzled about the bitterness. With the honey and the cinnamon, we found it rather sweet yet earthy. The vinegar added a slight brightness. The smokiness from the chipotle very well could have been responsible for the bitterness.

        • I was a bit tired last night so I think I missed the obvious reason for the bitterness because of that. You see, I cooked the carne adovada simultaneously in the same water as a ham hock I had smoked first (which we had tonight and was delicious by the way). The problem with cooking something sous-vide that has been smoked, is that the smoke leaks out into the water of the sous-vide. Since the smoke can leak out of one bag into the water, it can also leak from the water into the other bag…with the carne adovada. I should have thought of that before deciding to cook them together (which seemed such a good idea, because the carne adovado needed 48 hours at 57 degrees and the ham hock 72 hours at 57 degrees; both went in on Sunday and we had the adovada on Tuesday and the ham hock on Wednesday).
          I will try again soon!

  5. Pingback: Weekend Link Love - Edition 277 | Mark's Daily Apple

  6. richard, may i ask if you or your bride are from new mexico? if so, what part? my husband is from albuquerque and is excited for me to try this dish. thank you!

  7. Richard,
    Are you or your bride from New Mexico? My husband is from Albuquerque. Living in Tennessee, he is awful homesick and can’t wait to try this dish. Thanks!

    • Hi, Aly. No. Neither of us are from New Mexico; however, Baby Lady is from El Paso which is close enough. :D We both love New Mexico and if you look at our About page you will see we were married in the Loretto Chappel, Santa Fe, New Mexico. I hope he likes the dish. :)

  8. Hello Richard, this is a great carne adavada! Lovely spices and lots of love went into this dish! I love your blog and look forward to keeping in touch. PS, I also love your apron! Take care, BAM (from Hong Kong)

    • Hi, Bobbi. Thanks for the very nice compliment. Eha made mention of you and your lovely blog just the other day. :) I look forward to keeping in touch and reading more of your blog, too.

  9. Pingback: Whole30 {round two} | My Real Life

  10. Pingback: Roasted New Mexico Red Chile Stew | REMCooks

  11. Pingback: Carne Adovada Sous-Vide | Stefan's Gourmet Blog

Food for thoughts

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s