© 2013 REMCooks.com

Grilled Chile Marinated Pork Tenderloin with Fire Roasted Salsa

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

If you liked the Fire Roasted Tomato, Green Chile and Corn Salsa, you going to love this dish. In fact, this is the reason I made the salsa in the first place. This was a stunningly delicious meal and relatively simple, too.

It’s been a while since we posted a pork recipe. I actually love pork but I love most food. :) Despite my love of pork and piggy goodness, we have been eating quite a lot of seafood recently. Given it’s summertime, we do that. Right now, seafood is very abundant in the markets. It’s always light, refreshing, versatile and cooks quickly. It is perfect for summer fare, especially with the temps in the upper 90s F and 100+ F. Lately, however, the temperatures in DFW have come back to the bearable levels of the upper 80s F to low 90s F. In fact, last week the mornings started out in the upper 60s F and never got above 88 F. This is almost unthinkable Texas weather in August. It was a good thing, too, because I spent most of last week working a fire scene inspection with no AC, no roof and nowhere to hide from the sun. Ah, but I digress. When the temperature drops like this, I’m more inclined to be outside, to grill and to eat something other than seafood. So is the Baby Lady. Consequently, when I decided to make a salsa it wasn’t with the idea of chips and salsa although we made enough to do that, as well. (What can I say? The organic tortilla chips flew off the shelf and attacked me!!!) I really made the salsa with the idea to serve with a meat, either chicken or pork (remember Baby Lady doesn’t eat red meat). Inasmuch as we hadn’t had pork in a while, I was leaning toward pork. So, Baby Lady and I discussed pork chops, pork shoulder, pork loin, and pork tenderloin. We finally decided upon grilling pork tenderloin. It’s always such a nice protein and grills beautifully but how were we going to prepare it? We could take the simple approach with a little salt and pepper. That’s always nice but I wanted something with a little more kick to it. After all, it’s chile season again and you know how we love chiles. :) So, I opted to do a green chile marinade and finish it with the fire roasted salsa I was planning on making. It turned out great! You get the flavor of the grilled pork tenderloin with the flavors of the green chile, garlic and lime coupled with the sweet roasted goodness of the salsa with just a touch of heat. Your family will love this. It’s a really simple dish to prepare and is loaded with flavor. If you’re in the mood for grilling, this is a wonderful recipe to try. It not only works with pork but you could do this with steak, as well. This is what we did.

Ingredients

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Instruction

Now, in the ingredient photo you will notice that I used some previously roasted, cleaned and chopped New Mexico green chiles I had from last fall. If you can, buy some Hatch chiles because now is the season. Buy them, roast them, clean them (do not run water over them in cleaning because you will remove a lot of the flavors) and freeze them. They keep beautifully in the freezer. In fact, this typically is the way people in New Mexico, the Southwest and Mexico ensure they have green chiles throughout the year. If you have never roasted a chile, you can find the “how to” process here. Once roasted, we place them flat in a vacuum sealer and seal them. They will lay flat in your freezer making storage a breeze. :) Then, when you want roasted chiles for a dish, take them out of the freezer, thaw them out (they thaw quickly) and viola roasted chiles ready for you to use.

To start, roast the garlic on the grill.

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Add the roasted garlic to the food processor.

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Now, add the roasted New Mexico green chiles

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

the olive oil

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

lime juice

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

and salt

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Process the ingredients until you have a smooth mixture.

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Spoon over pork tenderloins coating completely.

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Cover with plastic wrap or foil, place in fridge and allow to marinate for 4 – 6 hours. Remove from fridge and allow to reach room temperature, roughly 30 minutes. In the meantime, start your grill.

Place the pork tenderloins on the grill over medium heat.

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Cook for 3 – 4 minutes to get some nice grill marks and turn.

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com – look at those beautiful grill marks

Cook an additional 3-4 minutes until you have reached your desired doneness.

Remove from grill and allow to rest for 5 minutes.

To serve, slice the pork tenderloin on an angle.

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

place a bed of Spanish rice in the middle of the plate and lay the sliced pork tenderloin on top.

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Spoon the Fire Roasted Salsa over the pork tenderloin

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com

Serve & enjoy!!!

© 2013 REMCooks.com
© 2013 REMCooks.com
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21 thoughts on “Grilled Chile Marinated Pork Tenderloin with Fire Roasted Salsa”

  1. I followed the steps of preparing and grilling this pork up to the end and I could almost taste how delicious it is. I love rice, I love pork and I love salsa, so this is just the perfect meal for me. I would eat it anytime. It truly looks appetizing! Thank you for sharing and for always giving very detailed and clear instructions. Best wishes!

    1. Thanks, Liz, for the very nice compliment. The flavor on the pork was wonderful. If you notice, we only used one pork loin for the two of us for dinner. We used the other for a delicious salad with a creamy jalapeño salad dressing. Post forthcoming. :)

  2. A very appetizing dish to put in the menu Q indeed! Scrolling down the page I wondered whether the term ‘hatch chiles’ would appear [it has on about 4-5 S Californian ones just this past week] – yes, found it! A name I shall remember: A few blogs actually showed pictures: looked very much what I can buy most of the year here, but must be different. Methinks the vegetable/fruit manager at my ‘local’ may have the answer :) ! Love the lean pork, so oft eat rice and the salsa has my name on it!

    1. Hi, Eha. Thanks for the nice comments. Hatch chiles are a species of capsicum grown in an area in New Mexico that runs north and south along the Rio Grande from Arrey, New Mexico, in the north, to Tonuco Mountain to the south of Hatch, New Mexico. Most of the varieties of chile cultivated in the Hatch Valley have been developed at New Mexico State University in Las Cruces New Mexico over the last 100+ years. So, there is a lot of science (non-GMO) involved in these chile varieties. The chiles grown in this region are very consistent in size, flavor and production. There are multiple varieties of Hatch chiles that range from mild, like an anaheim, to medium like a poblano, to hot like a serrano. They also vary in size from 6 – 8 inches to some that are 13 plus inches. Right now (through mid-October), Hatch chiles are in season and available throughout the southwest. We like the hotter versions of the Hatch chiles. They have such great depth of flavor and that nice little kick at the end. I will buy at least another 10 lbs before the season ends and roast them. In the wintertime, the hot chiles in a braises, soups, sauces and stews are a perfect way to warm you through and through. In addition, they just taste so darn good. :)

      1. Richard, heaps of thanks for the ‘lesson’ I really and truly appreciate! I was not aware of a Hatch Valley; I was not aware they could resemble a poblano or serrano I actually grow each year . . . so: different, and in some ways the same! All I knew was that I could access chiles of the colour, shape and size shown on some of the photos! A few bloggers have said one can freeze them for later use: you obviously roast them first! Am saving your very useful description . . . thanks!

        1. Hi, Eha. Just so I haven’t confused you, the only resemblance in New Mexico green chiles and Poblano and Serrano chiles is the heat level. The New Mexico green chile most closely resembles the anaheim pepper in appearance, texture and flavor. Of course, this is no surprise because anaheim chiles were originally grown in New Mexico. The name “Anaheim” derives from Emilio Ortega, a farmer and founder of Ortega foods, who brought the seeds from New Mexico to the Anaheim, California in 1890 where they flourished. Between 1890 and now New Mexico State University and the chile farmers in New Mexico have worked together to create countless hybrids and variations of New Mexico green chiles. The general appearance of a New Mexico green chile is one that is roughly 1 to 1-1/2 inches broad at the top of the chile tapering down to a point. It is a grassy green color that will turn orangish to red as it ripens. Now, you know the rest of the story. :)

  3. Ahh Richard, I am way behind in my Reader Board on WP, as I’ve worked 20 days straight without a day off and have *barely* had time to even post recipes, let alone cook for over two weeks, my husband has taken on that duty now. And then I’m off for a week to catch that elusive Chinook Salmon! However, I must say, this recipe looks divine! I can’t wait to catch up on what I’ve missed lately when I get back. I do appreciate your cooking style and blog. XO :)

    1. Hi, Kathryn. Thanks for the compliment and kind words. Sorry to hear work has you so busy. I hate it when work gets in the way of the pleasures of life. ;) Hopefully, things will calm down for you work-wise in the immediate future. I’m very much looking forward to photos of the big Chinook when you catch it. Fresh salmon is one of my very favorite fish. In fact, fresh salmon and tuna are my top favorites.

  4. Hi Richard, cooking meat marinated with chiles is something I’ll have to try. Could I use the dried chiles for something similar? No hatch chiles available here, although we do have fresh green chile peppers around the year (lots of greenhouses in NL). I guess I would marinate and cook the pork sous-vide at the same time, and then finish it quickly on the grill.

    1. Hi, Stefan. If you can find the green chiles with a little heat I think you will very much like this dish. The green chiles are a little more vibrant in flavor than the dried chiles. The dried chiles have an earthier flavor and the undertones of the chile are enhanced through the drying process. I will make sure we have some roasted Hatch chiles when you visit in February. :) I used New Mexico green chiles because I had some from last year I wanted to use before I bought another 10+ lbs. this year. If you were in Mexico, the chile of choice would be either the serrano chile, a wickedly hot little green chile, or the jalapeño. You should play around the with fresh green chile peppers you have available to see how they work. :)

  5. What a great looking dish, Richard! Love the photo the perfectly grilled, sliced pork being plate. Thanks for the lesson regarding freezing the chiles. I didn’t see hatch chiles at the market today but, then again, I wasn’t looking for them. Now that I know their season, I’ll look for them. This is a dish that I really want to try. Thanks for sharing your incredible recipe.

    1. Hi, John. Somehow I missed this comment when you posted it. Thanks for the very nice compliment. This was very tasty, indeed. Hopefully, you have seen Hatch chiles in Chitown by now. They are everywhere in DFW. I’m hoping to get to El Paso to visit Baby Lady’s family sometime in September so I can buy a case and bring it back. If I buy them in El Paso, I can choose from a wide variety of New Mexico chiles and they’re around $1/pound. They are so plentiful there, you smell them roasting everywhere. In DFW, the selection of New Mexico chiles is very limited, i.e. hot or mild, and the price is $3.00/lb. If I order them online, the price is even higher and the shipping cost is outrageous. Ah, the price we pay for being food afictionados. ;)

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