Steamed Mussels in Red Thai Coconut Curry

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

Here’s another mussel recipe. I think this makes 5 different mussel recipes on the blog now. We just can’t help it. We like mussels a lot and this spicy Thai inspired dish truly fits the bill for a quick and simple, wonderful, evening meal. Don’t just take our word for it give it a try. :)

OK, in prior posts I explained how Baby Lady loves her mussels. It may well be her very favorite food. We’ve also discussed how mussels are farmed, that they provide great health benefits and have a wide variety and range of habitat. So, there really isn’t much for me to say, other than read the prior posts on mussels if you didn’t know any of this. ;) What I can tell you is that because Baby Lady loves mussels, we eat them fairly regularly. As such, we are always trying new ways of preparing them. Baby Lady loves coconut and I love Thai food, in general, and especially red Thai curry paste. There is something about that coconutty, spicy, earthy yet tangy Red Thai curry that just makes my hear sing. Inasmuch as Baby Lady was hankerin’ for some mussels, I decided to try a Thai twist on them and I’m sure glad I did. This mussel dish is fabulous. If you like red Thai curries, you will love these mussels. This is what we did.

Ingredients

  • 2 Tbsp olive oil
  • 4 cups chopped onion
  • 2 Tbsp finely chopped peeled fresh ginger
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1-2 jalapeño pepper, stemmed, seeded and diced (small dice)
  • 2 Tbsp red curry paste (preferably homemade – recipe here)
  • 2 cup coconut milk
  • 1 cup dry white wine
  • 1 Tbsp honey
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 4 lb mussels, scrubbed and debearded
  • 1-1/2 cup basil leaves, chopped and divided
  • 3 limes, zested and juiced
  • lime wedges, for garnish on the side

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

Instruction

Heat a large pot over medium-high heat and add oil.

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

Now, add the onions

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

the ginger

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

garlic

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

and now the jalapeño.

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

Sweat the onions for 3 – 4 minutes until the onions begin to just soften.

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

Now add the curry paste (I ran out of homemade so I had to use store bought. :( The flavors would have been much brighter and more pungent with homemade red thai curry paste.)

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

Cook another minute, stirring so as to avoid it scorching, and add the lime zest

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

coconut milk

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

white wine

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

honey and salt

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

Bring mixture to a boil and cook for 2 – 3 minutes.

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

Now add the mussels.

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

Cover and cook 5 minutes or until mussels open. Remove from liquid discarding any unopened shells.

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

Add 1 cup chopped basil

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

and the lime juice. Bring back to a boil and remove from the heat.

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

Pour the coconut red thai curry sauce over the mussels.

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

Sprinkle the remaining basil over the top.

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

Serve with lime wedges and enjoy.

© 2013 REMCooks.com

© 2013 REMCooks.com

NOTES: Everyone has their own spicy heat tolerance. If your red thai curry has a considerable kick, use less jalapeño. If it has less kick, add more. If you can’t take the heat, omit the jalapeño or substitute small diced bell pepper. It’s up to you. I seed the jalapeños but leave in as much ribbing as possible. It’s the ribbing (not the seeds) that has the greatest amount of capsicum that provides the heat. If you seed the jalapeños and remove the ribbing, the jalapeños will have very little heat, if any. The amount of jalapeño used in this dish looks like a lot and it provided quite a kick but I used 2 very large jalapeños which, when diced, yielded probably 1/3 cup. Most people would use half the jalapeño in the photo but, hey, some like it hot. ;)

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23 thoughts on “Steamed Mussels in Red Thai Coconut Curry

    • That really bites. I had food allergies as a child (chocolate) and thankfully outgrew them. Tell a 6 year old child he can no longer eat chocolate. :( As an adult, my mom developed an allergy to shellfish, i.e. shrimp, lobsters, etc. You have my sympathy.

  1. You’ve just inspired me to prepare mussels differently for a change. (I always make them with pasta and broccoli, or in a mixed seafood dish like paella). I’ll check out all five recipes and pick one that I like best :-)

  2. I love the approach Richard. I would be a traditional steam in white wine kind of a guy. This has opened my shell as it were. Great pouring shots (as if I need to tell her).

    • If done right, mussels are a wonderful meal. They have a stronger flavor that holds up well with Thai curries. Fix them as an appetizer for a dinner party. That way if you find you still aren’t a fan of mussels you won’t have s many to eat. ;)

  3. I’m a big mussels fan, too, Richard, but mine usually are served in some sort of pasta. I like that you went Thai this time and I’ll need to check this out. By the way, that giant bowl of mussels is about as enticing as a bowl of mussels can be. :)

    • Hi, John. We like mussels with pasta. The broth that you get from the mussels is so flavorful that you definitely need something to make sure you get the very last drop. Baby Lady, however, loves crusty breads. So, more often than not we serve them simply in a bowl with a nice crusty loaf of bread on the side. You can also shell the mussels for those people who don’t want to play with their food, make the broth a little thinner and serve them as a soup. They really are pretty versatile. :)

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